Tag Archives: Padlet

My ePortfolio Learning Journey: Part 2

Here is a ‘Down and Dirty’ Summary of my work towards my Eportfolio goals/Final Project since my last post:

  • Liaised with staff, Upper Primary Ed Tech Coach and PYP coordinator to revamp Portfolio Essential Agreements:

ISZL Portfolio Agreements

  • Co-planned and co-led 2nd ePortfolio Staff meeting , where we looked critically at portfolio posts in teams/cross grades and cross platforms (Blogger).
  • Filled out Ambassador PD form, and requested free Seesaw Swag.  My T-shirt has arrived!

    My Seesaw swag arrived!

Our Portfolio Post Framing Questions:

  • How has the teacher or student shown the context for the learning? (What? Where? When? Why? How?)
  • What would help you to understand more about the context for learning? (What questions do you have?)
  • Is the individual student learning evident?
  • In what ways has the teacher scaffolded the post?
  • Is there evidence of teacher voice? Is it necessary? Is there evidence of student voice? Is it necessary?

Staff Meeting Critical Reflections:

Adobe Spark Page

Staff Portfolio Meeting, Created in Adobe Spark Page. All Photo Credits: Holly Fraser. Click to view! 

  • Led several training sessions for Assistants (KG, EY1, Gr1) on Seesaw & finding the learning, using the PYP essential elements framework (looking for specific skills found under the 5 Transdisciplinary Skills Heading; Attitudes)
  • Created Wallpapers for class iPads with Seesaw ‘Wow’ Work Poster to act as visual guide/reference 

Grade 1 iPad Wallpaper

  • Continue on-going discussions and work with grade 1 pilot class on blog option (set up blog, ‘advertised’ in Google + community of Seesaw Ambassadors for a Seesaw connected blog; communicated with parents, liaised between class teachers involved…plant to intro to students…forgot to consult admin…snap. 🙁
  • Created/Collated Resources ‘Seesaw for SLCs and beyond’ in a Padlet (I can’t get enough!) and shared with Staff 

Made with Padlet
  • Met with visiting Ed Tech Leaders to show/ walk them through Seesaw/how our school is using it and discuss with them the possibilities/limitations as they are currently making a decision about a platform for next year.  Walking someone else through our process was a nice reminder of just how far we have come!
  • Proactive effort to work with students using Seesaw: Modelling use of voice recorded comments and drawing tool in classrooms; recruiting students during Outdoor Learning to review their journal and begin to make comments on their own and other’s posts.
  • Continue to contribute to and update my ‘Course 5 Padlet‘ 
Students looking through their ‘journals’/portfolios at Outdoor Learning. Photo Credit: Holly Fraser

Checking in with Course 5 project: eportfolios

Okay, Coetail, here we go, course 5.  

 

I have taken a break from actively blogging about my Course 5 progress, but the few Coetail graduates I’ve spoken to are warning me against such breaks. So the other night I sat down to reflect on what I have been doing to accomplish my loose plan of a project and to brainstorm next steps.

I have narrowed the focus of my project–previously a bit too broad
— to be purely about (
learning about and promoting) the effective use of e-portfolios by staff and students (with a focus on the platform EY-Gr2 teachers use: Seesaw).

 

 

 

Here are some ideas I came up with:

+Use Padlet to store items/resources/evidence

-Storify…link/screenshots… of twitter chats…

-Google +

-Webinar — opening up blog 

Project Course 5 Goal:
Become a Seesaw Ambassador. Check.

-Seesaw ambassadorship 

 

-Staff meeting ‘E-portfolio Feedback and Check in Session’ + any Follow up…

-Feedback next steps/plan???

I began to think of eventual workflow–the final course project must eventually be in the form of a movie, likely edited in iMovie.  Would storing things in a Padlet (an online tool) be best for eventual retrieval to use in iMovie?   Would Google Drive be better? Or even simply a folder on the desktop–where I store much of my Coetail media to be uploaded, anyway?  

 

‘Made with Mirth’ Aside:

I discovered Padlet last year and used it as a platform for sharing/storing photographs in a collaborative photography project.  But I haven’t really revisited until a short while ago, when I recently discovered the Padlet extension from the chrome store (it enables me to easily add websites I am currently visiting to an existing padlet, or to create a new one.)  Padlet is just so nice and visual, I love the wallpapers, and the randomised and charming ‘made with mirth’ subtitles.  I love that I can share them, invite others to contribute/view, etc. (which is a work in progress) but I love that the possibility is there.
A fellow Coetailer at my school, Joy Walker, showed me how she used it to house interactive Maths games for use on the Smartboard.  I thought this was a great application–until we discovered that so many of the games she had put there a year or so ago either had broken links or wouldn’t work on the computer connected to the Smartboard–it likely needed a software update/plug in (?) in order to run the games. I am still new to solving these kinds of technicalities, and discovered these limitations/frustrations with older websites when I tried creating 100’s day Padlets, and Coding Padlets for Kindergarten. )

 

In any case, I wanted to try out Padlet as place to keep track of and demonstrate my progress with my Course 5 project on ePortfolios, as well as future plans (and do my best to maintain my Coetail media desktop folder) so here it is:

(link) https://padlet.com/holly_fraser/coetailcourse5

Made with Padlet

I am still learning how to best use this Padlet platform most effectively, and it does have its limitations. For example,  I wanted to have arrows going between my different posts, kind of like in a Popplet, or at least be able to organize the posts into discrete categories, like ‘PLN’ or ‘personal PD’–which I kind of can, by using the freeform method of organising posts and grouping like items.  I do like the variety of sharing options (similar to Google Drive) and continue to wonder at its possibilities…

Since I am currently a little obsessed with Padlet right now, my next thoughts turned to, “Could I use Use Padlet to house great Seesaw examples and/or resources and share with my staff?” Would people balk at learning/using yet another (despite its charm) platform?

After testing out the sharing of a ‘best practice’ post from Seesaw to a Padlet, I notice the key element (teacher/student comments) aren’t included, only captions.  This is not ideal. Sigh. Back to the drawing board.  

My Next Steps:

1. I will continue to update my course 5 Padlet (as I am exploring processing information more visually these days…)

2. Prepare Plan for upcoming Staff Presentation–‘Updated Portfolio Agreements and a Response to Staff Feedback on e-Portfolio journey so far.

Sample feedback: “More direct teaching of skills (taking photos, videos, recordings) so students can make better quality posts with EdTech leading this” 

A possible response: Create visually appealing posters “How to take a clear photograph that best demonstrates your work/learning” to be posted around classroom room, visit each class, give some direct instruction, provide the students with additional practice using specific skills.

3. Possibly prepare a presentation/session on Seesaw as an ePortfolio platform at the upcoming Learning 2 conference in Warsaw.  I was rather late submitting my proposal, and the scope may be more limited than the organisers have in mind, but it’s a possibility.  (Although in my haste to submit my already late proposal, I did not take a screen shot, the gist of my proposal :

Introduce Seesaw as an eportfolio platform, highlight its benefits (& potential drawback) and engage in a discussion on effective portfolio posts–how to best share/show student learning.

4. Continue to model best practice (when making my own Seesaw Posts) and learn as I go.

Sample Best Practice (IMHO): Hundred’s Day Stop Motion Video post to Seesaw:

(23 second video needs to be uploaded somewhere else then embedded here)

Elizan and Alex carefully watched another group make a “Hundred’s Day” stop motion movie, understood the technique (take pictures, adding one item at a time in groups of ten–no hands!) and were eager to get started themselves. They seamlessly worked out an agreement to take turns choosing and counting out the items to place on the light table. They checked and re-checked their progress by re-watching the movie, counting aloud by tens. Alex: “We have 70. We need 30 more. 3 more tens.” They worked efficiently, and were focussed until the end.

Photography Collaboration: From Deciding to Acting, Course 1 Final Project

Last week I was busy thinking about, deciding on and planning a meaningful collaborative project with my young Early Years students and another class at my school.  Now, my “school” is actually 3 separate campuses somewhat spread about in Central Switzerland: 1 small Elementary School in canton Luzern (mine) a larger Elementary/Middle School and a High School, both in canton Zug.

As I mentioned last week, our small campus is closing at the end of this year, due to declining enrolment, and most of students will next year attend our much larger campus in Zug.  We have been encouraged to begin the process of a meaningful transition for our students, which include in person/on site meet ups–a recent field trip went really well– but I am hoping to continue these “meet-ups” online through a joint photography project.

We were actually initially inspired to look into photography a little more deeply by a fellow Coetailer’s (and ISZL’s own amazing High School English teacher, Tricia Friedman) invitation to collaborate:

https://www.coetail.com/triciafriedman/2016/02/28/lets-give-them-something-to-blog-about/

Screen shot from Tricia’s Padlet

So far this year my young students have taken hundreds of not so great, slightly out of focus, thumbs in the way of pictures of the floor using the ipad.   I am hoping through this project our understanding of what makes a picture good, interesting and meaningful will improve, but also that contributing to this “movement” is a great way to improve the feeling of community and connection across our campuses, which otherwise share little more than a name, despite its promise:

3 Campuses, 1 International Experience

The more I have thought about the nature of my planned collaborations across campuses, I realise they are really 2 separate learning collaborations…the first one being a response to a specific blog prompt set by Tricia on her Blog Prompt Padlet.  I had to choose a prompt appropriate for 4 & 5 year olds, (not so easy), so a prompt involving the obviously highly visual medium of photography jumped out at me.

World Photography Organisation,

World Photography Organisation, Shortlist contender

Now, this World Photography Organisation contest may well be over by the time we actually get around to making our choices, but it is of little matter.  The website itself is sweeping and the amount of different categories is a bit overwhelming, and I knew clicking around and waiting for web pages to load while my wriggly 4 year olds squirmed was not going to cut it, so I chose some relevant photo categories (Nature and Wildlife, Panorama, Smile and People) and pre-selected a few photos in each category that I thought would particularly resonate with the kids (photos of children, animals and landscapes similar to those of our own beautifully situated campus).

While choosing a favourite to win the contest and defending their choices using some newly learned insights into photography and story telling is part of the goal of this project, it is really only the jumping off point.  I am actually interested in how members of the High School English class (and anyone else who responds to the blogging prompts) respond to our posts about photography. And more so, I would like this exploration to inspire my students to become better picture takers and therefore better story tellers, using the medium of photography.

A picture is worth a thousand words.

This brings me to the second part of my collaborative project.  Our beloved campus closing, while a sad event, is also an opportunity to make sure our story is told, and our small voices heard.   Part 2 of my planned collaborative Photography Exploration will be to challenge my students (and EY at Zug campus) to capture the essence of our campuses–taking pictures of favourite locations, moments, people and friends (similar categories to those I chose from the wpo) and to share them with one another. Here at Luzern, we are blessed to be located right on lake, surrounded by mountains, fields fountains, and forest. Our building’s name is Villa Kämerstein, the Early Years building is in a quaint Swiss chalet.  There has got to be some photographic gems in there somewhere.

taking pics

Yep…this is typical EY, upside down and finger prints on the lens

The idea to involve the Zug campus actually stemmed from an earlier email conversation between myself and one of the EY teachers there, we were studying different constructions, in particular bridges, and she had the idea of somehow creating a project to “bridge” our two campuses; sharing the story of our two campuses to help with the transition our students will make next year.  I loved the idea, but at the time was unsure to how to proceed.

Now that I feel more confident in how this could play out, (sharing the picture or “story of our 2 campuses” on a Collaborative Photography Padlet) I am left waiting for a response from the other campus.  Despite a well thought out email to 6 teachers & 4 assistants, only one has expressed interest in joining the project.  Our Tech Coach warned me I might face reluctance…not necessarily due to lack of interest…but a lack of time, understanding, etc. Some told me they hadn’t even read the mail.  Deep sigh.  My biggest challenge will not be improving the photographic or reflection skills of my students, as evidenced by some results from our second day of picture taking;

trees

Our tree lined driveway, cropped and filter added by Emiliana, 4.

mountain

View of the lake and mountains, photo untouched by Johnathan, 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It will be ensuring the collaboration aspect of my Collaborative Picture Taking Project actually takes place.